A week later

Well. That was a surprise. While it may not be the result myself or millions of other Australians were hoping for, it’s the result we have been given, and the result we must accept out of respect for the democratic process which our country is so lucky to have. I’m not going to do some sort of boring analysis of every little detail of the entire week that’s passed since the election, (if you want that, head over to any News Corp publication), but rather provide insight into my thoughts about some of the key parts of the week.

What happened: I still don’t know. Nobody should trust a poll ever again.

The resignation of Bill Shorten: If anybody could lose the unlosable election, it was bound to be Bill. If he couldn’t win this election, he would never have been able to.

ALP Leadership contest: Of course, from the moment Bill Shorten resigned, the ALP became abuzz with talk about who would possibly replace him. While Anthony Albanese has been the favourite to replace Shorten for a long time, I had really hoped that Jim Chalmers might be given a chance. After watching him speak throughout the campaign, and taking a look at his past, I feel that he would have been a refreshing modern change for Labor, and someone who would have been able to target multiple demographics. However, as we’re now aware, it looks like Albanese & Marles are set to take up the top two jobs within the ALP. Wouldn’t have been my first pick, but then again, its a hell of a lot better than what the Liberals have to offer.

The Second Morrison Ministry: Because we all thought there would be a second! Let’s be real though, it’s just as bad as the last ones. Angus Taylor has surprisingly maintained his role as Minister for Energy, despite the water buyback scandal that emerged in the weeks leading up to the election. An interesting exclusion from the ministry is Tim Wilson, who has been creating quite the name for himself within the Liberal Party recently, most predominantly as the architect behind the furore surrounding franking credits.

Clearly it’s set to be an interesting three years which will surely be as drama-filled as the last three. To those who refuse to accept the result of the election, you aren’t doing any good for anyone. Focus your anger on holding this government fully accountable for everything they do (because they were totally prepared to maintain government). Take this as some sort of comfort, we’re already 1/156 through it!

The one thing Clive’s spot on about

“Australia ain’t gonna cop it, no Australia’s not gonna cop it, Aussies not gonna cop it any more.” Those words, while hard to take seriously in their original context, tell a lot about the state of politics in Australia in 2019.

Think about what the United Australia Party’s main vote winning strategy is across the nation. It’s not stopping the boats, or blocking the Adani project. It’s the promise of ending the political chaos of Canberra, and focusing on making the lives of the people of Australia better. No matter your view on the UAP, I think we can all at least accept that to quite a large amount of people, the idea of Canberra being refreshed is an appealing one.

If you aren’t convinced that people are losing faith in democracy in Australia, I’ll point you to this article in The Guardian, which shows that between 2013 to 2018, peoples satisfaction in Australian democracy fell from 72 percent to 41 percent. At this rate, fewer than 10 percent will have trust in Australian democracy by 2025. This is an alarming statistic, and one which is not receiving anywhere near as much attention as it should.

I’m not saying that the UAP or its policies are necessarily good (and I personally disagree with the party on almost all fronts), but rather pointing to it as an example of what happens when people lose faith in the system. Just look at the 2016 US Presidential Election if you don’t think distrust in the system can turn bad very quickly.

No matter which party gains a majority at the next election, Australian politicians need to work together more on both the issues they agree on, and especially those that they don’t, to achieve a better future for all of us. In today’s divided world, the last thing we need is an unnecessarily divided nation.